Last edited by Doule
Friday, February 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 1652-54 found in the catalog.

letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 1652-54

Dorothy Osborne

letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 1652-54

  • 98 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Folio Society in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain
    • Subjects:
    • Osborne, Dorothy, 1627-1695 -- Correspondence.,
    • Temple, William, Sir, 1628-1699 -- Correspondence.,
    • Statesmen"s spouses -- Great Britain -- Correspondence.,
    • Women -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century.,
    • Great Britain -- Social life and customs -- 17th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementedited by Kingsley Hart.
      ContributionsHart, Kingsley, ed., Folio Society (London, England)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA429.T2 A2 1968
      The Physical Object
      Pagination213 p.
      Number of Pages213
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5262624M
      LC Control Number75387684

      Dorothy Osborne was the wife of the famous Sir William Temple, and apology for her biography will be found in her own letters, here for the first time published. To see him wholly taken up with running on errands for his wife, and teaching her little dog tricks! But I forget myself; I meant to chide, and I think this is nothing towards it. This is the world; would you and I were out of it: for, sure, we were not made to live in it. This helps us to date the letter. I came down hither not half so well pleased as I went up, with an engagement upon me that I had little hope of shaking off, for I had made use of all the liberty my friends would allow me to preserve my own, and 'twould not do; he was so weary of his, that he would part with it upon any terms.

      That bit of paper did me great service; without it I should have had strange apprehension, and my sad dreams, and the several frights I have waked in, would have run so in my head that I should have concluded something of very ill from your silence. Never again will their faith be shaken by fretting and despair; and these vows are never broken, but remain with the lovers until they are set aside by others, taken under the solemn sanction of the law, and the old troubles vanish in new responsibilities and a new life. I'll e'en to bed as soon as I have told you that I am very much Your faithful friend. There I spent the latter end of the summer, and at my coming home found that a gentleman who has some estate in this country had been treating with my brother, and it yet goes on fair and softly. Cromwell was meditating an abolition of the Parliament, and a practical coronation of himself.

      If what you say of my Lady Leppington be of your own knowledge, I shall believe you, but otherwise I can assure you I have heard from people that pretend to know her very well, that her kindness to Compton was very moderate, and that she never liked him so well as when he died and gave her his estate. Dorothy may have dated her letters to ordinary folk; but as she writes to her servant once a week at least, she seems to have considered dates to be superfluous. I know not how my brother comes to be so well informed as you say, but I am certain he knows the utmost of the injuries you have received from her. It was the last fortress to surrender.


Share this book
You might also like
students handbook of British mosses

students handbook of British mosses

Mellonis Illustrated Review of Human Anatomy

Mellonis Illustrated Review of Human Anatomy

Gerald Laing.

Gerald Laing.

Legal problems concerning unmarried couples

Legal problems concerning unmarried couples

Playing by the rules

Playing by the rules

Bruckner and Mahler.

Bruckner and Mahler.

First-order functional calculus

First-order functional calculus

Clothes (First Word Board Books)

Clothes (First Word Board Books)

Thousand aviator study: methodology

Thousand aviator study: methodology

Accenture

Accenture

Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 1652-54 book

He resumed his office of Master of the Rolls, and in August of that year was elected to the Irish Parliament as one of the members for Leitrim, Sligo, and Roscommon. The letters were written in the years andand form a clear and connected story of the love affairs of the young couple during that time.

I have heard no more of him, though I have seen him since; we met at Wrest again. How near was Dorothy to the high places of the State when this man and Henry Cromwell were among her suitors!

Letters From Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple 1652

Hutchinson tells us of herself. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, but his heart, by his special wish, was placed in a silver casket under the sun-dial at Moor Park, near his favourite window seat. John, afterwards the Duke of Bolton, early in From this time we lose sight of Dorothy, and are reduced to form our opinion of the terms on which she and her husband were from very slight indications which may easily mislead us.

Pim were alive again, I wonder what he would think of these proceedings, and whether this would appear so great a breach of the Privilege of Parliament as the demanding the 5 members? Keep this as a testimony against me if ever I do, and make me a reproach to them by it; therefore be secure, and rest satisfied with what I can do for you.

Temple replies mistaking him for another Howard, whereupon Dorothy points out that she means Arundel Howard who was Henry, second son of the Earl of Arundel. This, soberly consider'd, is enough to let us see our error, and consequently to persuade us to redeem it.

And be it so, only you must pardon me if I cannot agree to give you false hopes; I must be deceived myself before I can deceive you, and I have so accustomed myself to tell you all that I think, that I must either say nothing, or that which I believe to be true. I that knew how much I wanted it, thought this the safest place for me to engage in, and was mightily pleased to think I had met with one at last that had wit enough for himself and me too.

The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple 1652

But for God sake let me ask you what you have done all this while you have been away; what you have met with in Holland that could keep you there so long; why you went no further; and why I was not to know you went so far? His letters are lost, but hers have been preserved; and many of them appear in these volumes.

Cromwell, indeed, was at the height of his glory, his honours lie thick upon him, and now, if ever, he is the regal Cromwell that Victor Hugo has portrayed, the uncrowned King of England, trampling under foot that sacred liberty, the baseless ideal for which so many had fought and bled. Other names will come to the mind of every reader, but many of these are "people letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple know by name," as the phrase runs, mere acquaintances,—not friends.

The world had ceased to wonder at English democracy giving laws to their quondam rulers, and the democracy was beginning to be a little tired of itself, to disbelieve in its own irksome discipline, and to sigh for the flesh-pots of a modified Presbyterian monarchy.

He was the architect of the Privy Council Ministrywhich, though it failed, was an early effort to establish an executive along the lines of what later came to be understood as Cabinet government. I received one from her to-day full of the kindest reproaches, that she has not heard from me this three weeks.

Freeman makes me mistrust myself extremely, not that I am sorry I did appear so to him since it kept me from the displeasure of refusing an offer which I do not perhaps deservebut that it is a scurvy quality in itself, and I am afraid I have it in great measure if I showed any of it to him, for whom I have so much respect and esteem.

Think me so still if that will do anything towards it. In earnest, 'tis a pleasant place, and would be much more so to me if I had your company.

I knew you could not choose but like her; but yet, let me tell you, you have seen but the worst of her. But lest you should think I have as many worms in my head as he, I'll give over in time, and tell you how far Mr.

Jeremy Taylor; very courtly and superior persons are some of these, and far removed from our world. Oh, my conscience! Sir William's career posted the couple abroad for periods of their married life, including time in both Brussels in the Spanish Netherlands and the Dutch Republic.

In England, inwhen he was member for Chichester, he concurred with the Presbyterian vote, thereby causing the more advanced section to look askance at him, and he was turned out of the House, or secluded, to use the elegant parliamentary language of the day.By: Dorothy Osborne () A lively, interesting and important collection of 17th century love-letters written by an English lady, against the background of the Civil War and the Restoration.

First Page: THE LOVE LETTERS OF DOROTHY OSBORNE TO SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE, Edited by Edward Abbott Parry. New York, Author: Dorothy Osborne. summary pdf The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple,summary chapter 2 The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple,sparknotes The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple,The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, dc2 Excerpt From The Letters From Doro/5().

Edward Abbott Parry (Parry, Edward Abbott) 'Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, ' More editions of Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, ISBN (). By heavens, thou mov'st a leg, and now its brother. The Book of Humorous Verse 'Tis thou that mov'st the world through ev'ry part, The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 'Tis thou that mov'st the world through ev'ry part, Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple (.

Get this from a library! The letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, (). [Dorothy Osborne; Edward Abbott Parry, Sir].

Dorothy Osborne

The Online Books Page. Online Books by. Dorothy Osborne (Osborne, Dorothy, ) An online book about this author is available, as is a Wikipedia article.

Osborne, Dorothy, Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple (), ed. by Edward Abbott Parry (illustrated HTML at Celebration of Women Writers) Help with reading books-- Report a bad link-- Suggest a new listing.